New Zealand wine
Located very close to the South Pole, with just 33.000 hectares of vineyards, is one of the most important wine regions in the New World, for the extraordinary growth it has experienced in recent years and the excellent quality of its wines. The origin of the wine production in New Zealand began with the arrival of European settlers. His first ...
Located very close to the South Pole, with just 33.000 hectares of vineyards, is one of the most important wine regions in the New World, for the extraordinary growth it has experienced in recent years and the excellent quality of its wines. The origin of the wine production in New Zealand began with the arrival of European settlers. His first vineyards planted started from 1836, in Waitangi, when it was a British colony by the English winemaker James Busby, known as the father of Australian wines. The first vineyard was established by the Catholic Church in 1851, Hawke's Bay, for the purpose of preparing the altar wine At first the wine was unimportant activity, until the late 60s when the UK's entry into the European Community eliminates favorable trade conditions with New Zealand. From that moment, on the one hand, dairy products and meat were affected, but on the other, are lifted restrictions on alcohol sales and farmers began transforming New Zealand farms vineyards. From the first moment pushed for sustainable agriculture and its wines naturally. Its growth has been spectacular, in 1996 there were 7,800 hectares of vineyards and in 2004 there were over 22,000, in fact, the production and export of wine is already the main source of income of the agricultural sector in New Zealand. There are 10 main producing areas, each of which has a different individual climate and terroir, due to the size of the country and its varied typography, in its two main islands      The North Island more suitable for growing red varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. It is divided into the following wine regions: Auckland, located northeast of the island, is the oldest wine-growing region, with growing Cabernet Sauvignon. Gisborne, located southeast of the Bay of Plenty, produces 10% of the grapes dedicated to white wines. Hawke's Bay, on the east coast of the North Island, produces more than 20% of the grapes in a sunny climate favors the cultivation of noble grape of Bordeaux. Wairarapa, south of the island, are made based reds Pinot Noir and white Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon and Gewürztraminer.      The South Island is the most important wine-growing area, with more than 7,500 hectares of Sauvignon Blanc. Its most important wine-growing areas are: Nelson, located on the north coast, is the oldest wine area of ​​the island where the cultivation of the vine goes back to 1860-1870. Predominant culture of the grape variety Chardonnay and Riesling. Marlborough, southeast of Nelson, is the largest wine region, which represents 50% of the area of ​​vineyards in New Zealand, and the largest producing region. It has a dry and sunny climate, ideal for growing white varieties: Müller-Thurgau, Riesling and Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon ink .. Canterbury, located east of the island, with a climate of low rainfall and long autumn with warm days and cool nights perfect for growing grape varieties Chardonnay, Riesling and Pinot noir. Central Otago, located in the south, is the smallest area of ​​cultivated vineyards. With a climate of low rainfall, with dry, sunny autumns.The most famous wines are the reds from Pinot Noir, and prepared from blends of Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon, and to a lesser extent, produced from varieties such as Malbec, Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc and Syrah. They are alive and fruit and are characterized by their acidity, aromatic concentration and elegance. They also produce white wines based on Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay, along with others, to a lesser extent such as Chenin Blanc, Pinot Blanc, Riesling, Gewürztraminer and Pinot Gris.
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New Zealand wine

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